The Writing Life

Information, inspiration and insights into the writing life

Photo of Maria Tumarkin

In 2013 Writers Victoria launched a mentorship program for writers from non-English speaking backgrounds. The Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CALD) Mentorship Program was established to support and promote the diversity that forms the fabric of our writing and our broader community.

The five recipients of our 2013 CALD Mentorship Program were Beverly Almeida, Lian Low, Fatima Sehbai, Hariklia Heristanidis and Hoa Pham – representing both metropolitan and regional Victoria, and emerging and established positions on the writing spectrum.

I grew up in the goldfields of central Victoria and for all my childhood years my family lived in a miner’s cottage. The metre-thick walls were stone and mud brick and the kitchen and wash-house were detached. We had open fires in the bedrooms, a chip-heater to warm the bathwater and a long-drop toilet outside.

My paternal grandparents lived in the same street – also in a miner’s cottage, a weatherboard with small rooms, tiny window panes, shiny brass doorknobs, a glassed-in verandah at the back that served as “the sleepout” and a two-roomed cellar underneath. There were many...

Writers Victoria welcomes the release of Creative Australia, the new National Cultural Policy launched by Arts Minister Simon Crean yesterday afternoon.

Here’s a quick summary of what the National Cultural Policy will mean for Victorian writers.

headshot of Lee Kofman

Many writers, particularly the confessional ones to whose clan I belong, depend on people in their lives to inspire their work. But what makes a good muse? “Nice” people would rarely stimulate art. Art demands a complex character and often such complexity has something to do with force, intensity. In short, Kerouac nailed it.

headshot of Clovis Mwamba

Clovis Mwamba writes about the refugee experience.

The 2012 Hazel Rowley Literary Fellowship was awarded to Stephany Steggall last night at Adelaide Writers' Week.

Steggall will use the $10,000 prize to write a biography of Thomas Keneally, Booker Prize winner for Schindler’s Ark.

The announcement was made at a lecture commemorating the life and work of biographer Hazel Rowley, where special guest lecturer Alex Miller reflected on his friendship with the late Rowley.

headshot of Lee Kofman

When famous writers decide to get grumpy with their fans, one of their popular complaints is being asked supposedly ridiculous questions, such as whether they write with a pen or a pencil, or nowadays – a keyboard.

As of today, the Wheeler Centre Hot Desks are home to writers keen for a space to call their own. With the help of The Readings Foundation, Hot Deskers receive a $1000 stipend, a workspace for two months and support from the Wheeler Centre resident organisations.

Photo of Euan Mitchell

As more authors move into publishing their own ebooks, the sometimes confusing implications of their decisions are becoming more and more important. In the lead-up to his new Digital Makeover for Writers in March, Euan Mitchell explains the truth behind some common misconceptions in digital publishing.

Euan is a former senior editor for a major publisher. As a writer he has three novels and a range of non-fiction books to his credit. He has also successfully published other writers in a range of genres. Euan has taught writing, editing and publishing at Monash University, Victoria...

headshot of Lee Kofman

Welcome to my first ever feature for this website. Here I’m going to develop a conversation with you about the craft of writing. More precisely, my intent is to focus on that tough beast called “the writing process”.

I believe that understanding this process is more important for a writer than learning so-called rules of craft, which in our post-Raymond Carver times, teachers and books on writing like to bestow on their students – such as, “don’t use any adverbs” or “no more than one adjective per noun is allowed”. But – have you ever read Gail Jones? Or that guy, Lev Tolstoy, for...