The Writing Life

Information, inspiration and insights into the writing life

Cover of Gurrumul: his life and music

We’re on the 13th floor of a glass tower in Elizabeth Street, Sydney, a couple of kilometres as the crow flies from where white settlers first set foot on the Australian continent.

Geoffrey Gurrumul Yunupingu, the Yolngu singer and composer, famous – these days – all over the world, is standing beside a long table on which 60 copies of a big, glossy book are stacked in piles of five.

headshot of Lee Kofman

Six years ago, after several years of working on a novel I’d provisionally titled The Russian Book of Lost Love, I discovered that it is possible to kill your own book. If you, too, contemplate murder, here are some strategies I’ve found helpful.

headshot of Lucy Treloar

The writing life is a strange and rollercoastish thing. This time last year I was about to put my first adult novel, 'The Things We Tell Ourselves', away and concentrate on my new book.

It was a hard decision to make after 2011, when I felt I was getting somewhere. I’d been awarded a mentorship through the ASA and an Asialink Writer’s Residency to Cambodia and, while there renewing my love affair with the country and undertaking research, had been contacted by a publisher who was interested in seeing the completed manuscript. Publication didn’t seem an impossible dream.

The Writers Victoria team high-tailed it home after The Salon last night to watch the Federal Budget unfold.

The theme for our monthly literary event was celebration, and there are certainly some things to celebrate in the budget forecast (but some things to be wary of too).

Jack Waghorn was one of five writers with disability who received an inaugural Write-ability Fellowship in 2013.

The Fellowships, a joint initiative of Writers Victoria and Arts Access Victoria, enabled Jack to work with mentor Bethanie Blanchard.

headshot of Lee Kofman

When internationally renowned Israeli novelist Aharon Appelfeld was barely nine years old he escaped a Nazi concentration camp in Romania, surviving by moving from one hiding place to another for the next three years. As an adult, still haunted by wartime horrors, he couldn’t work in confined spaces and wrote his novels in cafés of Jerusalem to where he moved in the aftermath of the Holocaust.

Indeed, Appelfeld used cafés not only as work spaces, but also as sources of inspiration.

headshot of WV Director Kate Larsen

The Writers Victoria Committee of Management is pleased to announce that Kate Larsen has been appointed as the new Writers Victoria Director commencing Monday, 13 May 2013.

Writers Victoria was thrilled to work with Scope on the 2013 Telescope Awards for writers with disability from across Victoria.

Suzanne McCourt orders a lemongrass tea and takes in the glistening sea from our sun-drenched spot on the deck of Brighton Baths Café.

Her first novel, contracted with Text Publishing, is due to be launched in February 2014; she is currently working on her second and she has recently released two self-published books – an anthology of her own poetry called The Lost Men, and a photo-gift book called Old Dogs: Lessons in Loving & Aging.

As we watch the dotted boats sailing out to sea, she reflects on her writing path. “I’ve now learned to get out of my head and listen to my...

headshot of Lee Kofman

In the autumn of 2008 I was approaching the 5th anniversary of my writer’s block. During those years I never stopped writing and sometimes even produced publishable works. However, writing had become much harder than it used to be and the ratio of bad work to good was incredibly high. I felt I’d lost my writing voice.