On Writing

Writers, editors, agents, publishers and more share their thoughts, experiences and stories.

Andrea Rowe is the president of the not-for-profit organisation, Peninsula Writers’ Club, a 60-member strong fellowship of writers on the Mornington Peninsula.

Lucinda Bain is a creative non-fiction writer based in Eltham, Melbourne, inspired largely by community and place. She writes about motherhood, the suburban environment, nature and the complexities of modern life.

Sally Holdsworth is a Melbourne-based editor, proofreader and emerging non-fiction writer. She completed the RMIT associate degree in professional writing and editing in 2018, and now works as a freelance business writer and editor.

Michael Metzger writes memoir, essays, commentary and historical fiction. His published work includes ‘Towards the Light – Growing Through Grief’. His recently completed novel ‘Under A Different Star’ is awaiting a publisher. With qualifications in literature and journalism, his interests lie in philosophy and travel writing. He has created and delivered numerous writing workshops and is a member of Yackandandah Writers. 

From May to August 2020, Writers Victoria in partnership with VALID, posted regular writing prompt for writers with disability. With so many of us isolated at home, this was a chance for us to reflect on our experiences and share them with others through our writing.

Stories From Home  aims to encourage, recognise, share and showcase the stories, writing and experiences of people with disability in a time when Covid-19 has halted or reduced our normal work, social activities and support services.

With stage four restrictions underway, and so many of us isolated at home for the second time, this is another chance to reflect on our experiences and share our stories. Let’s get creative again with our August Stories from Home writing challenge.

Following the success of Stories from Home in May and June, Writers Victoria in partnership with VALID, is asking writers with disability to respond to the prompt 'I look out my window'.

When Leone Purdy of the Sale Write-ability writers group decided to self-publish her poetry book, not everything went to plan.

I was elated. My first book published – and it was lovely. I felt pride in myself; a feeling that was new to me.  Was this beautiful, softcover, book of quirky, idiosyncratic poems really mine? Working with a publishing service had all seemed so easy. I’d paid them to edit and review my manuscript. Where once it had been a jumbled mash of incoherent, long-winded and unrhythmical verse, it was now a polished poetry book.

Writing may be a solitary pursuit, but it doesn’t follow that being a writer means resigning yourself to loneliness and isolation. Writing communities, large and small, exist in all kinds of forms, catering to all kinds of writers. Some communities develop organically.

A portrait of Anna Snoekstra

ERG: Can you talk a little about how you came to be a crime writer? Have you always been a fan of the genre?

AS: I’ve always loved suspenseful films. For a long time, I was infatuated with Film Noir, and loved trying to pick apart the ways tension was built and released in a story. I have always been a big reader, but was never really interested in crime novels. I think this is because I always saw them as very male and very conventional: a dead woman, a detective, a bad guy. It didn’t interest me.

When Lionel Shriver ignited public debate about cultural appropriation with her 2016 Brisbane Writers Festival opening address, ‘Fiction and Identity Politics’¹, followed by Yassmin Abdel-Magied’s swift rejoinder², I took it personally. Not in a white privilege, why-are-they-trying-to-stop-me-from-writing-whatever-I-want? kind of way, but in a way that made me pause and reflect on my own creative practice.