On Writing

Writers, editors, agents, publishers and more share their thoughts, experiences and stories.

Jo Case headshot

Your memoir needs to have a reason for being, says Jo Case. Ahead of her upcoming workshop, we talked to Jo about why it is important for a memoir to have a central theme.

A photograph of Andy Jackson

Each person has a particular insight and way of seeing the world, says Write-ability tutor Andy Jackson, and all people – particularly non-disabled – need to listen carefully. Andy will present ‘Myths, Realities and Elephants’ to the Write-ability Writers Group in Ballarat, and spoke to us about some of the myths and challenges facing writers with disability.

Laura Jean McKay headshot

There's no time for small talk in short story writing, says Laura Jean McKay. Ahead of her upcoming online Beginner Short Story Clinic, we talk to Laura about what draws her to the short story form.

A photograph of Karen Andrews

Writing is often loosely divided into fiction and non-fiction, but the reality is far more complicated. Karen Andrews discusses some of the key challenges ahead of her Write-ability: Finding the Form workshop.

There is a great deal of work to be done before a memoir is ready to be written. Ahead of her upcoming workshop, we talk to Lorna Hendry about the risks and rewards of research and interviews.

Roselina Press Headshot

If you're looking to change entrenched beliefs, using emotion can be more persuasive than facts, says Roselina Press. Ahead of her upcoming workshop, we talk to Roselina about using storytelling to bring about social change.

Business Writing program logo

Effective report writing is a key skill in business, government, and the non-profit sector, yet even experienced staff can struggle to keep a report engaging and concise. In the leadup to her half-day Business Writing workshop on Clear and Concise Reports in September, Kyra-Bae Snell shares insights from her years as a teacher, editor, and corporate trainer. 

As an aspiring writer many moons ago, my goals were clear. I wanted to write realistic fiction for children and young adults and I wanted to be published in the traditional trade market.

My manuscript is a little boat.

When asked how she is, my mother-in-law is fond of replying that any day she wakes up and can get vertical is a good one. I wish I could say the same about writing. That any day I get up and still know how to use words and create sentences, well, that’s a good day and therefore, a successful one. But it’s not true. Just because you can use words and out of them make sentences, doesn’t mean you’re a good writer or, at best, a successful one. The notions of ‘good’ and ‘successful’ are always up for grabs anyway… aren’t they?