Featured Writers

Short stories, features and poems from our writing community.

In her debut true crime book ‘Waiting for Elijah’, award-winning investigative journalist Kate Wild examines the events around the police shooting of a mentally ill man, 24-year-old Elijah Holcombe, in June 2009.   

You started investigating the fatal shooting of Elijah Holcombe as part of a segment for the TV show ‘Four Corners’. When did you know you wanted to investigate the story more deeply with a full-length book?

Since 2007, Writers Victoria has offered writers the use of a Glenfern writers’ studio for a period of three months, thanks to the support of the Readings Foundation (from 2007 to 2014) and the Grace Marion Wilson Trust (since 2009).

The Fellowships give authors the time and space to write, as well as the opportunity to be involved in a vibrant community of writers in the historic surroundings of the Glenfern mansion in St Kilda East.

Writers Victoria is thrilled to announce the finalists of the 2018 Grace Marion Wilson Emerging Writers Competitions.

Clare Rankine speaks to Enza Gandolfo about Enza's new novel 'The Bridge'.

It’s one of those Melbourne days where it rains so hard the street floods and you feel like you’re swimming. A swirl of red and yellow autumn leaves stick to the ankle and it’s a relief to take down your umbrella, be inside and warm. It’s on this day that I meet writer Enza Gandolfo at The Moat, where we sit tucked cosily away in the back, to talk over a coffee.

Coloured pencils

Thanks to a donation, Writers Victoria is running a series of professional development opportunities for women writers of colour and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women this year.

The program aims to reduce barriers and increase publication and professional development opportunities for women of colour and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women in Victoria.

It will include paid commissions, bursaries to attend a range of Writers Victoria courses, and a free training session for established writers on how to run writing workshops.

I nod hello to the barista and settle into my usual seat. I’m about to pull out my book when I see two people signing. They are sitting two tables over. I can’t help but really look at them. Their hands are flying up and down, touching cheeks, chins, ears, elbows. They are conversing rapidly; they are exchanging smiles. 

I keep my hands under the table; they thrash about like freshly hooked fish. They can’t speak. I dig my nails into my palms to punish them. 

Ally means partner, or so I’ve heard. Someone who cares, who'll be there when the walls fall down. Ally is an action, an alliance you build, not something you identify as. Ally is meant to mean something, like a marriage, because that's how marriage started too.

The 2017 Deborah Cass Prize for Writing has been awarded to Rafeif Ismail, a 23-year old Perth woman from a Sudanese background.

Prologue: One Year Ago

 

“There are too many ghouls in the forest. We need you,” said Kolya.

The poor kid was exhausted and pale. Silvie gave him a second fruit bun, figuring there was no harm in a little petty crime.  The buns weren’t selling; besides, it was depressingly likely that she’d have to resign from the bakery before the day was over.

“I’m not due back at the barracks for another week,” she said.

“Bd hr d—” Kolya paused, swallowing his mouthful before trying again. “But you’re the best, and we need you.”

 

A seed, lovingly pressed into the earth. A child’s first experience with a deep and unconditional love. My most treasured possession.

Fur fabric worn smooth over years of clutching. Dull black glass eyes and a crooked frown. Endless needlepoint scars from patchwork, healing rips and tears from being loved so hard.

Neither children nor new parents are original or clever with names, so his name is simply Teddy.