Featured Writers

Short stories, features and poems from our writing community.

Ahead of her workshop on 16 Rules of Writing Memoir, Sarah Vincent writes about how to manage bitterness, anger and hurt in memoir writing. 

Years ago I did a workshop on memoir writing with the great memoir writer and teacher Patti Miller. Her workshop was full of terrific advice, but one thing she said in particular has stuck with me …

“There are two things readers of memoir will not put up with: bitterness and self-pity,” she said.

A photo oj Jax Jacki Brown in a wheelchair, holding a phone and wearing a black T-shirt with pink text reading 'Piss on pity'.

Jax Jacki Brown has been at the forefront of increasing the prominence of writers with disability in publishing. Ahead of our Own Voices: Why Writing Matters forum in Wodonga, she talks about change, the importance of stories, and her involvement in WV’s new Publishability program.

Writers Vic's Ellen O'Brien spoke to Rafeif Ismail ahead of her workshop: Writing and Intersectionality.

In your workshop, participants will learn about intersectionality and how to write diverse characters and characters of colour in a respectful way. Could you tell us a bit about intersectionality and who you think will benefit from your workshop?

Deborah Sheldon is a writer from Melbourne, Australia. Some of her latest releases, include the dark literary collection 300 Degree Days and Other Stories, the bio-horror novella Thylacines, the dark fantasy and horror collection Perfect Little Stitches and Other Stories, and the bio-horror novel Devil Dragon.

In her powerful and candid memoir, ‘Eggshell Skull’, Brisbane-based writer Bri Lee recounts her year working as a judge’s associate in the Queensland District Court.

To read Maria Tumarkin is to embark on an intellectual journey, one that covers diverse terrain – the personal and the political via philosophy, history and memoir – taking paths that seem at first to deviate, but then interweave, taking you even deeper into the subject. I spoke to Maria about her practice, her processes and the convergences of her compelling new non-fiction work, ‘Axiomatic’.

In our previous issue, Michelle Scott Tucker invited non-fiction writers to submit 200 words of a work in progress. Here are the finalists.

One of the first questions I ask myself when I begin a new creative non-fiction work, short- or long-form, is existential in nature (and stolen from Shakespeare). To be or not to be? Am I going to appear in my work or not? Or, to what degree am I going to be present? Because in creative non-fiction, the author is always there, if not as an explicit ‘I’ then as the organising consciousness hovering over the work, palpable in thematic, structural and stylistic choices, with all their implicit assumptions.

In her powerful and candid memoir, ‘Eggshell Skull’, Brisbane-based writer Bri Lee recounts her year working as a judge’s associate in the Queensland District Court. During this time, she witnessed numerous instances where victims of sexual offences were denied due justice.

‘When another writer in another house is not free, no writer is free.’ – Orhan Pamuk