Featured Writers

Short stories, features and poems from our writing community.

Prologue: One Year Ago

 

“There are too many ghouls in the forest. We need you,” said Kolya.

The poor kid was exhausted and pale. Silvie gave him a second fruit bun, figuring there was no harm in a little petty crime.  The buns weren’t selling; besides, it was depressingly likely that she’d have to resign from the bakery before the day was over.

“I’m not due back at the barracks for another week,” she said.

“Bd hr d—” Kolya paused, swallowing his mouthful before trying again. “But you’re the best, and we need you.”

 

A seed, lovingly pressed into the earth. A child’s first experience with a deep and unconditional love. My most treasured possession.

Fur fabric worn smooth over years of clutching. Dull black glass eyes and a crooked frown. Endless needlepoint scars from patchwork, healing rips and tears from being loved so hard.

Neither children nor new parents are original or clever with names, so his name is simply Teddy.

Earlier this year, Tania Cañas, Arts Director at RISE Refugee in Melbourne, wrote an article 'Diversity is a White Word’ that subsequently exploded on social media, igniting discussion across the arts and in literary journals (Koubaroulis, 2017; Aranjuez, 2017; Iyer, 2017).

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Rajith Savanadasa

Today I meet writer Rajith Savanadasa at the Malthouse Theatre. It’s afternoon tea time, and the Malthouse café is busy with actors letting off steam and directors reading over their notes. A small school group climbs up and down the staircase, sparrows flit in and out through the open windows; the place is a hive of activity. Suddenly alighting from the staircase is Rajith, content and calm. He buys a cup of coffee and we sit in the middle of the crowd to chat.

“It devastated me,” says Sofie Laguna of Nick Broomfield’s film about American serial killer Aileen Wuornos, who was convicted of killing six men and executed by lethal injection in 2002. It wasn’t, however, the obvious discomfort such a film would provoke that disturbed Laguna, instead it was the grim, desperate, dreadful childhood that Aileen endured.

Randa Abdel-Fattah interviewed by the Garret

Randa Abdel-Fattah has a very impressive CV. She is a lawyer, a human rights advocate, a community volunteer, and a researcher – she has a PhD in sociology. And of course, she is a writer. Randa studies Islamophobia, racism and multiculturalism in Australia.

As part of The Garret Podcast, Nic Brasch interviewed Randa at the State Library of Victoria, and started by talking about her earliest experiences with books.

Notebook and glasses on a map

A love poem to Writers Victoria from outgoing Director Kate Larsen...

Today, on one of those wonderful winter summer days, I make my way to meet writer Melanie Cheng at her local library Bargoonga Nganjin in Fitzroy North.

I’m a little early so, after I nab one of the heavily coveted study rooms, I flick through my copy of Melanie’s newly released book, 'Australia Day'.

Photo of Tariro Mavondo singing into a microphone

At the Writers Victoria fundraiser in December 2016, spoken word poet Tariro Mavondo performed her poem 'Black Girl'.

Tariro is a Melbourne-based artist of Zimbabwean descent. She is dedicated and committed to working with the creative industry, corporate sector and community and health services to provide professional pathways and mentoring programs for young Culturally and Linguistically Diverse and Visibly Different artists.

Kurdish-Iranian journalist, Behrouz Boochani, detained on Manus Island since August 2013, has been a PEN International case since 2015. The international campaign on his behalf has been spearheaded by PEN Melbourne. Boochani has produced a growing body of work, in a range of genres, exposing the horrors of incarceration on Manus Island. The 900 men, in the prime of their lives, have been imprisoned for four years now.