Writing Tips and Tools

Get tips, tricks and tools on the craft of writing.

Photo of writers sitting round a table, only their hands visible, along with pens, notebooks, laptops and drinks

Writing groups are considered by many emerging and established writers as an extraordinarily important way to maintain one’s writing practice.

As a writer, a writing group can expose you to the work and creative processes of others, give you deadlines to keep you moving along with your work, act as a space for creative exploration, and provide a forum to gain feedback on your writing.

But how do you establish a Writing Group? Where do you find other writers to work with? And how can a writing group support your own writing?

Photo of Kate Forsyth with the sea in the background

In this extract from her author talk at Writers Victoria in November 2014, Australia's 'Queen of Fairy Tales' Kate Forsyth reveals some of the conventions of fairy tales.

Kate is the bestselling author of books for both adults and children. Kate’s books have sold more than a million copies internationally and have been published in 17 countries. She is an accredited master storyteller and was recently voted one of Australia’s Favourite 20 Novelists. Her adult books include ‘The Wild Girl’ and ‘Bitter Greens’ and ‘The Puzzle Ring’ and ‘The Gypsy Crown’ for children.

Photo of Kate Forsyth with the sea in the background

In this extract from her author talk at Writers Victoria in November 2014, Australia's 'Queen of Fairy Tales' Kate Forsyth reveals the origin of her own fascination with fairy tales and how she has re-spun many well-known tales.

Photos of Graeme Simsion and Paddy O'Reilly

Do you know how your story will end before you put pen to paper? Or do you write it by the seat of your pants?

WV tutors Graeme Simsion and Paddy O'Reilly compared their different approaches in Writers Victoria's inaugural Plotters vs Pantsers debate in October 2014.

Graeme is the author of 'The Rosie Project', which has become an international bestseller. He is a plotter. Paddy O'Reilly has published three novels and a short story collection. She is a pantser.

Photo of Tom Doig at a lecturn in front of a sign that says 'The Wheeler Centre'

In his author talk for Writers Victoria in September 2014, Tom Doig talked about his Mongolian mis-adventures and writing about other places.

In this extract, Tom shares his thoughts on nomads, morons and the future of travel writing.

Photo of Tom Doig at a lecturn in front of a sign that says 'The Wheeler Centre'

In his author talk for Writers Victoria in September 2014, Tom Doig pondered the future of travel writing…

About Tom Doig

Tom Doig is a writer, PhD candidate and moron. In 2013 Allen & Unwin published his first book, Moron to Moron: two men, two bikes, one Mongolian misadventure. Tom has an MA in Hitler Comedy and is currently a Journalism PhD student, researching people’s experiences of climate change in Australia.

Photo of Catherine Deveny leaning against a brick wall
We are excited to announce our first podcast series for Writers Victoria.

For our first podcast Catherine Deveny came into chat to us about writing and motivation.

Catherine is a comedian, author, professional speaker and broadcaster wll known for her work as columnish with The Age and The Guardian, and as a Melbourne International Comedy Festival regular.

Tony Birch speaking from a lecturn with microphones

In this talk for Writers Victoria in June 2014, author Tony Birch said that asking whether non-Indigenous writers should write about Indigenous characters is the wrong question.

Tony is the author of Shadowboxing (2006), Father’s Day (2009) and Blood (2011), which was shortlisted for the 2012 Miles Franklin award.

Photo of Yannick Thoraval

Yannick Thoraval came in to chat to us about speechwriting, which is the theme of his upcoming Summer School workshop in January.

Yannick is a professional communications advisor, with more than seven years of speechwriting experience. He teaches in the Professional Writing and Editing Program at RMIT.

 

Tony Birch, wearing thick-framed glasses speaking from a lecturn with microphones

In this talk for Writers Victoria in June 2014, author Tony Birch spoke about writing place or setting from an Indigenous perspective.

In this extract, Tony shares his thoughts on storytelling, place-naming, ‘tanderrum’ and more…

Tony is the author of Shadowboxing (2006), Father’s Day (2009) and Blood (2011), which was shortlisted for the 2012 Miles Franklin award.