Publishing Tips and Tools

Get tips, tricks and tools on the business of writing and getting published.

Photo of Clare Allan-Kamil

Writers Victoria sat down with WV tutor, mentor and manuscript assessor Clare Allan-Kamil to get her take on the art of synopsis writing.

As the synopsis is the first example of your writing an agent, editor or publisher sees, it’s vital to get it right – if they don’t like your synopsis they might not bother to read your sample chapters. As daunting as it seems, there are tricks and tools you can use to make your synopsis stand out.

Photo of Alex Adsett

I often have authors approach me for publishing contract advice with the almost sheepish disclaimer “this looks pretty standard”, with the usual follow up, “so it will probably be alright”.

I always want to ask, “how do you know?”, and unless you are an author who has done their research or published before, do not just trust that every publisher will send a contract that complies with industry norms.

Photo of Clare Allan-Kamil

Writers Victoria sat down with WV tutor, mentor and manuscript assessor Clare Allan-Kamil to get her take on the art of synopsis writing.

As the synopsis is the first example of your writing an agent, editor or publisher sees, it’s vital to get it right – if they don’t like your synopsis they might not bother to read your sample chapters. As daunting as it seems, there are tricks and tools you can use to make your synopsis stand out.

Photo of Donna Ward resting her head in one hand

“The best way to get published is to write extraordinary writing,” says WV tutor and Inkerman & Blunt publisher Donna Ward.

Donna is the founding managing editor of indigo, the journal of Western Australian creative writing, editor of Sotto Magazine, and publisher at Inkerman & Blunt. Her prose has been published in Island Magazine, Ext2012 and Fish Anthology 2012.

Photo of Clare Allan-Kamil

Writers Victoria sat down with WV tutor, mentor and manuscript assessor Clare Allan-Kamil to get her take on the art of synopsis writing.

As the synopsis is the first example of your writing an agent, editor or publisher sees, it’s vital to get it right – if they don’t like your synopsis they might not bother to read your sample chapters. As daunting as it seems, there are tricks and tools you can use to make your synopsis stand out.

Photo of Alex Adsett

Literary agent and publishing contracts wiz Alex Adsett has this piece of advice to offer writers considering a pay-to-publish deal for their work.

Alex is a publishing consultant and literary agent who offers commercial contract advice to authors and publishers, including for print, digital, film and self-publishing contracts. She also represents select genre authors as a more traditional agent.

Photo of Hazel Edwards

Today a creator also needs to be an ‘authorpreneur’, says WV tutor Hazel Edwards…

Hazel writes quirky, thought-provoking fiction and fact for adults and children, across varied media. Known for There’s a Hippopotamus on our Roof Eating Cake and Authorpreneurship, Hazel’s 200 books have been translated into 10 languages.

Photo of Sheila Drummond in front of a bookcase

Sheila Drummond from The Drummond Agency is our first monthly tipster, tackling the topic: how to pitch your work to a publisher.

Sheila Drummond has over three decades of experience in the publishing industry; she brings this to her role as a literary agent working with over 40 authors in quality fiction and non-fiction across many genres for adults and young adults.

Photo of Foong Ling Kong

Editor, publisher and lecturer extraordinaire Foong Ling Kong takes on the art of writing a non-fiction proposal.

Foong Ling Kong has nearly two decades’ experience in the publishing industry as an editor and a publisher of books across a wide range of genres. She has taught at Deakin and guest-lectured at the University of Melbourne and RMIT. She has worked in-house at Penguin, Hardie Grant, Melbourne University Press and Allen & Unwin, and freelanced for most Australian publishing houses.

What rate should you charge for your writing or workshop? Rates of pay can vary from organisation to organisation.

Each magazine, newspaper, or journal will have a standard rate of pay. This information is usually available on their website, or you may need to contact them directly.