Featured Writers

Short stories, features and poems from our writing community.

headshot of Mohamed Abbas Omar

Mohamed Abbas Omar from Somalia, writes about the migrant experience.

headshot of Fatema Ahmed

I’m writing about diaspora, because I’ve lived in different places, in Bangladesh, Kuwait, India, Burma and now here in Australia, and because of that I don’t feel like I belong in any one particular place anymore. So I don’t feel all that Bangladeshi, nor do I feel all that Arabic, or Indian or whatever. I don’t feel like I belong to a particular place anymore, because I’ve lived in so many different places.

headshot of Heidi Everett

Heidi Everett was one of five writers with disability who received an inaugural Writeability Fellowship in 2013.

Over the coming months we’ll be catching up with some of our long-standing members to celebrate Writers Victoria’s 25th anniversary. We’ll seek counsel with the elders of the Writers Victoria community to find out what’s kept them writing over all these years and why they love it so much. This month we speak to 90-year-old Writers Victoria member Jo-Ann Burke.

headshot of Mohamed Abbas Omar

Mohamed Omar's writing on the refugee experience, 'The writer must give a voice to the voiceless people.'

headshot of Kate Hood

An extract from Kate Hood's play Ruthie. Kate Hood was one of five writers with disability who received an inaugural write-ability fellowship.

headshot of Clovis Mwamba

Clovis Mwamba's refugee experience of fleeing across the Congo River.

headshot of Fatema Ahmed

Fatema Ahmed experience of writing about diaspora.

headshot of Mohamed Abbas Omar

When you have issues that need to come out I think the writer will be the right person. Not the politician, not the business people, because maybe they have their own interests. In economy and politics there are always many manipulations – in every aspect of life – so as the writer I think you can be like a silent lawyer, representing the voiceless people.

The writer must give a voice to the voiceless people.

Photo of Kelly Gardiner

The summer we found the boat, Jake turned thirteen.

“Jake’s the head of the family now,” Mum announced.

Then she turned to me. “You have to do what he says.”

I couldn’t see how it made any difference. Jake had been bossing me around since the day I was born.