Featured Writers

Short stories, features and poems from our writing community.

A portrait of Ailsa Wild

An acrobat, a poet, a whip cracker, and now a tutor with Writers Victoria, Ailsa Wild answered some questions about her books, her practice, and writing for children in preparation for her series of workshops in 2019. 

Writer Karina Ko has won the 2018 Deborah Cass Prize for emerging writers from migrant backgrounds for her manuscript extract ‘Things I used to Believe’.

Chosen from a shortlist of eight, ‘Things I Used to Believe’ was announced as the winner on 5 December at an event in Melbourne.

Sean O'Leary is wearing a dark blue top and using white earbuds

I have schizophrenia of the paranoid variety. I write about it quite a lot, both directly from my experience and not. The title story of my second short story collection was called ‘Walking’. It was about me walking out of the psych ward at The Alfred hospital going to my new accommodation at a boarding house in St Kilda. It was a scary day, given that the CAT team had intervened in my life six weeks earlier to put me in the ward. I didn’t go gently into the good night, but I went.

Vincent Silk stands in front of a cream brick wall. He has short brown hair, brown eyes and is wearing a black hoodie.

2016 Write-ability Fellowship recipient Vincent Silk recently published his novel ‘Sisters of No Mercy’. Diane McPherson interviewed Vincent about his writing and the role the Write-ability Fellowship played.

To help celebrate International Day of People With Disability​, Write-ability is proud to publish 2018 Write-ability Fellow Anthony Riddell’s “speculative non-fiction” work Days of love and E.F.T.P.O.S.

A  prolific writer, Anthony's work is some of the most wildly energetic, seemingly nonsensical writing you will ever read.  As former Write-ability Project Coordinator Harriet Gaffney said when assessing Anthony's fellowship application “it’s a bit like applying an electric current to your brain the way it makes your synapses spark!”

A photo of Sarah Madden lying on a squiggled hot pink couch on a mosaic floor. Sarah is wearing a black dress and has a bowler hat partial;ly covering her face

Ahead of the launch of her novella ‘Blue in the Red House’, Sarah Madden explores how genre labels can be hard to pin down – in life and in writing.

A photograph of Jessica Obersby. Jessica has short red hair and has a parrot sitting on her shoulder

Things I fear:

Being buried alive

The awful, breathless struggle of drowning

Losing the ones I love

Being late

That I will lose my job

That the planet will die due to climate change

That I am unlovable

That my anxiety will win

– Runner-up of the 2018 Grace Marion Wilson Prize for Fiction –

Ahead of her workshop on 16 Rules of Writing Memoir, Sarah Vincent writes about how to manage bitterness, anger and hurt in memoir writing. 

Years ago I did a workshop on memoir writing with the great memoir writer and teacher Patti Miller. Her workshop was full of terrific advice, but one thing she said in particular has stuck with me …

“There are two things readers of memoir will not put up with: bitterness and self-pity,” she said.

A photo oj Jax Jacki Brown in a wheelchair, holding a phone and wearing a black T-shirt with pink text reading 'Piss on pity'.

Jax Jacki Brown has been at the forefront of increasing the prominence of writers with disability in publishing. Ahead of our Own Voices: Why Writing Matters forum in Wodonga, she talks about change, the importance of stories, and her involvement in WV’s new Publishability program.