The Writing Life

Information, inspiration and insights into the writing life

Is there a writer dad or other special person in your life? If so, we have the perfect gift.

A Writers Victoria gift voucher can be put towards the cost of any of our workshops, mentorships, manuscript assessments or writing studios. Vouchers can also be used to activate or extend a Writers Victoria membership, to support their writing all year round.

Gift vouchers can be purchased by calling the Writers Victoria office on 9094 7855 between 10am and 4pm, Monday to Friday.

Five bells toll at 4.45am. The world is humid darkness and my mind, a sleep deprived fog. I’m supposed to jump out of bed in fervent prayer but my body shakes from the shock of waking up too early, even after two years practice.

Lost and naïve, traipsing through the wards

I listened to a chest and heard

A harsh rasping whisper

Blowing between beats and breaths

All but intangible from the outside

Yet I hear rumbling beneath my steth.

Behind all this was a person

Patiently waiting while I fumble.

I absolutely love to write. I always have. I first realised this from the enjoyment that I had when writing essays in high school. It resonated with me a great deal, to create a narrative prose on a topic. Then at university, more essays and reports, culminating in a thesis. These early forays led to a job in technical writing – equipment manuals, to be exact. I was writing – I was happy. But then, many things happened in my life at once, and my love of writing was placed to the side.

Five years ago I would never have expected to be working full-time in publishing, let alone supporting two amazing agents at Australia’s largest literary agency. Every day is different and as an assistant you get to see the nuts and bolts of publishing – from reading first drafts and giving editorial feedback to being privy to overseas rights and film deals and the nitty gritty of contract negotiation and royalty statements. I feel really lucky to do the work I do and be paid for it, which means I can genuinely look forward to going to work every day.

In her powerful and candid memoir, ‘Eggshell Skull’, Brisbane-based writer Bri Lee recounts her year working as a judge’s associate in the Queensland District Court.

To read Maria Tumarkin is to embark on an intellectual journey, one that covers diverse terrain – the personal and the political via philosophy, history and memoir – taking paths that seem at first to deviate, but then interweave, taking you even deeper into the subject. I spoke to Maria about her practice, her processes and the convergences of her compelling new non-fiction work, ‘Axiomatic’.

In our previous issue, Michelle Scott Tucker invited non-fiction writers to submit 200 words of a work in progress. Here are the finalists.

One of the first questions I ask myself when I begin a new creative non-fiction work, short- or long-form, is existential in nature (and stolen from Shakespeare). To be or not to be? Am I going to appear in my work or not? Or, to what degree am I going to be present? Because in creative non-fiction, the author is always there, if not as an explicit ‘I’ then as the organising consciousness hovering over the work, palpable in thematic, structural and stylistic choices, with all their implicit assumptions.

With the pace of journalism increasing, it can be tempting to rush the writing process. But for Michael Green, journalist and producer of ‘Behind the Wire’ and the multi-awardwinning ‘The Messenger’ podcast, the most compelling stories come from taking a careful, considered approach to interviewing and writing, empowering your subjects and putting ethics at the heart of your work.